Betting Rules

Latest and Updated Betting Rules

Betting rules: (How to bet, types of bets.)

The basics

  • The main object of sports betting is to beat the ‘Oddsmakers‘ or the ‘Odds Compilers‘ and win some money. Additionally, placing a bet on your favorite sport event makes the game exciting and more enjoyable.
  • Betting is done through Sportsbooks (US) or Bookmakers (UK) entities that accept bets. You can bet on the outcome of several sporting events, such as; FootballTennis, Cricket and games.
  • To place a sports bet, you go to a sportsbook, physical or online. You could also bet over the phone with many sportsbooks. Note that a sports book or sportsbook is not the same as an oddsmaker. The sportsbook simply accepts sports bets. An oddsmaker is a person who sets the betting odds.
  • You need to state what you are betting on by making a selection, the type of bet and the amount you are wagering. Your selection will obviously depend on the odds offered, so you will want to examine the range of odds available before you make a decision.
  • There are many types of bets you can place. Some sportsbooks may offer more betting varieties and combinations than others. Below is a list of the more common types of bets.
  • Straight bet or Single. This is the simplest and most common bet. You bet on a winner at given odds.
  • Point Spread. This bet lets you bet on a winner from two selections who have been made equal by allocating appropriate points to the underdog team. The Point Spread is the number of points allocated and is shown with a – sign for the favorite and a + sign for the underdog. The favorite has to win by more than the Point Spread for you to win, otherwise you lose your bet even if the team wins. Inversely, if you bet for the underdog, that team has to lose by less than the Point Spread for you to win. If the favorite wins by the exact Point Spread, then it is a push or a tie. You get your bet back. To eliminate a tie result, the oddsmakers sometimes include a half point spread. Since scores use full numbers only, one team has to win outright.
  • Buy Points. Also, to buy Key Points. Move the Point Spread favorably at a price.
  • The Moneyline. This establishes the odds for each team but inversely proportional to what would have been a Point Spread, and is indicated by a + for the underdog and a – sign for the favorite. Say team A is favorite and quoted at -180 and B is the underdog at + 120. The bets offered would be 10:18 odds-on for the favorite, and 12:10 for the underdog. For every $180 you bet on A you would win $100 or lose $180, but for every $100 you bet on B you would win $120 or lose $100.
  • Total. A bet for the number of points scored in the game by both teams combined, including points scored in overtime.
  • Over/Under. A bet that the combined number of points scored by the two teams in the game will be Over or Under the total set by the oddsmaker.
  • Parlay or Accumulator. A multiple bet. A kind of ‘let-it-ride’ bet. Making simultaneous selections on two or more games with the intent of pressing the winnings of the first win on the bet of the following game selected, and so on. All the selections made must win for you to win the parlay. If a game is a tie, postponed or cancelled, your parlay is automatically reduced by one selection; a double parlay becomes a straight bet, a triple parlay becomes a double. A parlay bet can yield huge dividends if won.
  • Parlay or Accumulator. A multiple bet. A kind of ‘let-it-ride’ bet. Making simultaneous selections on two or more games with the intent of pressing the winnings ofTeaser. It is like a parlay, but with the option to add or subtract points (called ‘moving the line’) from one or more Spread bets. When betting a teaser additional points are either added to the underdog or subtracted from the favorite. The odds vary according to the number of points the spread is moved and the number of teams combined to form the teaser. As in the parlay, all selections must win for the teaser to win. Teasers odds are usually worse than the parlays. the first win on the bet of the following game selected, and so on. All the selections made must win for you to win the parlay. If a game is a tie, postponed or cancelled, your parlay is automatically reduced by one selection; a double parlay becomes a straight bet, a triple parlay becomes a double. A parlay bet can yield huge dividends if won.
  • If-wager. A bet that allows the bettor to make a second wager, up to an equal amount, pending a win on the first selection.
  • Open Wager. Open wagers allow the bettor to play teasers or parlays making a selection at different times and even different days.
  • Future. A bet on a future event. At the start of each season, the sportsbooks give out odds for teams to win a certain championship. The odds change as the game date approaches and in most cases get shorter, but if you win you get paid at the original odds that you took. This is possibly one of the most profitable bets if you have considerable knowledge of the sport that you are betting on including the players, and a good sense of judgement.
  • Exotic Bets. Betting on unusual events. Some sportsbooks post odds and take bets on a wide variety of other sports related events and activities. A few others will take bets on just about anything you can think of.
  • Proposition Bet or Prop Bet. An offer of bets at odds and conditions chosen by the sportsbook, usually on ‘Exotic’ bets.

Football Rules

Football (Soccer) is one of the oldest sports in the world and with that; it’s also one of the most recognised. The pinnacle of the international game comes in the form the Football World Cup. There are also tournament such as the Euro Championships, Copa America and the African Cup of Nations. Domestically the strongest leagues come from England (English Premier League), Spain (La Liga), Italy (Serie A) and Germany (Bundesliga). In parts of the world the sport is also known as Soccer.

Object of the Game

The aim of football is to score more goals then your opponent in a 90 minute playing time frame. The match is split up into two halves of 45 minutes. After the first
45 minutes players will take a 15 minute rest period called half time. The second 45 minutes will resume and any time deemed fit to be added on by the referee
(injury time) will be accordingly.

Players & Equipment

Each team consists of 11 players. These are made up of one goalkeeper and ten outfield players. The pitch dimensions vary from each ground but are roughly 120 yards
long and 75 yards wide. On each pitch you will have a 6 yard box next to the goal mouth, an 18 yard box surrounding the 6 yard box and a centre circle. Each half of
the pitch must be a mirror image of the other in terms of dimensions.

Essentially the equipment that is needed for a soccer match is pitch and a football. Additionally players can be found wearing studded football boots, shin pads and
matching strips. The goalkeepers will additionally wear padded gloves as they are the only players allowed to handle the ball. Each team will have a designated captain.

Scoring

To score the ball must go into your opponent’s goal. The whole ball needs to be over the line for it to be a legitimate goal. A goal can be scored with any part of
the body apart from the hand or arm up to the shoulder. The goal itself consists of a frame measuring 8 feet high and 8 yards wide.

Winning the Game

To win you have to score more goals than that of your opponents. If the scores are level after 90 minutes then the game will end as a draw apart from in cup games
where the game can go to extra time and even a penalty shootout to decide the winner. Players must use their feet to kick the ball and are prohibited to use their
hands apart from goalkeepers who can use any part of their body within the 18 yard box (of which more can be found out in the next section).

Rules of Football (Soccer)

  • A match consists of two 45 minutes halves with a 15 minute rest period in between.
    Each team can have a minimum off 11 players (including 1 goalkeeper who is the only player allowed to handle the ball within the 18 yard box) and a minimum of 7
    players are needed to constitute a match.
  • The field must be made of either artificial or natural grass. The size of pitches is allowed to vary but must be within 100-130 yards long and 50-100 yards wide.
    The pitch must also be marked with a rectangular shape around the outside showing out of bounds, two six yard boxes, two 18 yard boxes and a centre circle.
  • A spot for a penalty placed 12 yards out of both goals and centre circle must also be visible.
  • The ball must have a circumference of 58-61cm and be of a circular shape.
  • Each team can name up to 7 substitute players. Substitutions can be made at any time of the match with each team being able to make a maximum of 3 substitutions per side.
  • In the event of all three substitutes being made and a player having to leave the field for injury the team will be forced to play without a replacement for that player.
  • Each game must include one referee and two assistant referee’s (linesmen).
  • It’s the job of the referee to act as time keeper and make any decisions which may need to be made such as fouls, free kicks, throw ins, penalties and added on time
    at the end of each half.
  • The referee may consult the assistant referees at any time in the match regarding a decision. It’s the assistant referee’s job to spot offside’s in the match
    (see below), throw ins for either team and also assist the referee in all decision making processes where appropriate.
  • If the game needs to head to extra time as a result of both teams being level in a match then 30 minutes will be added in the form of two 15 minute halves after
    the allotted 90 minutes.
  • If teams are still level after extra time then a penalty shootout must take place.
  • The whole ball must cross the goal line for it to constitute as a goal.
  • For fouls committed a player could receive either a yellow or red card depending on the severity of the foul; this comes down to the referee’s discretion.
  • The yellow is a warning and a red card is a dismissal of that player. Two yellow cards will equal one red. Once a player is sent off then they cannot be replaced.
  • If a ball goes out of play off an opponent in either of the side lines then it is given as a throw in. If it goes out of play off an attacking player on the base
    line then it is a goal kick. If it comes off a defending player it is a corner kick.

The Offside Rule in Football

Offside can be called when an attacking player is in front of the last defender when the pass is played through to them. The offside area is designed to discourage
players from simply hanging around the opponent’s goal waiting for a pass. To be onside they must be placed behind the last defender when the ball is played to them.
If the player is in front of that last defender then he is deemed to be offside and free kick to the defending team will be called.

A player cannot be caught offside in their own half. The goalkeeper does not count as a defender. If the ball is played backwards and the player is in front of the  last defender then he is deemed to be not offside.

Tennis Rules

First of all, the rules of tennis are different (although mostly similar) for singles matches and doubles matches. But before we go over that stuff, let’s review some of the general tennis rules and regulations that apply to all of tennis before we learn how to play tennis for singles and doubles.

General Rules of Tennis

  • A ball must land within bounds for play to continue; if a player hits the ball outside of bounds, this results in the loss of the point for them.
  • Players/teams cannot touch the net or posts or cross onto the opponent’s side.
  • Players/teams cannot carry the ball or catch it with the racquet.
  • Players cannot hit the ball twice.
  • Players must wait until the ball passes the net before they can return it.
  • A player that does not return a live ball before it bounces twice loses the point.
  • If the ball hits or touches the players, that counts as a penalty.
  • If the racquet leaves the hand or verbal abuse occurs, a penalty is given.
  • Any ball that bounces on the lines of boundary are considered good.
  • A serve must bounce first before the receiving player can return it.

Scoring

  • Points – Smallest unit of measurement. Points increment from Love(0)-15-30-40-game.
  • Games – Games consist of 4 points each, and is won when a player reaches 4 points with at least a 2 point advantage.
  • Advantage Set – If a game score of 6-6 is reached and advantage set rules are used, a player/team can only win a set with a 2 game lead.
  • Matches – A match is usually played as best of 3 or best of 5 sets.
  • Deuce – Occurs if a score of 40-40 is reached. In order to win the game, a player/team must win 2 consecutive points in order to take the game.
  • If a player wins one point, they have advantage, but if they lose the next point, the score returns to deuce.
  • Tie-break game – If a game score of 6-6 is reached and tie-break set rules are used, players must play a tie-break game in order to decide who wins the set.
  • In a tie-break game, a player/team must reach 7 points with a two point advantage to win. For the serving format of a tie-break game, player 1 serves for the first point, player 2 serves for the next two points, player 1 serves for the next two points after that, etc.

What Do the Lines Mean?

  • Baseline – The baselines are the lines on either end of the court that determines the boundaries of play going lengthwise. They are also where a player serves behind.
  • Center Mark – The center mark determines the two halves of the tennis court. It mainly helps with service to determine where a player should stand prior to serving.
  • Center Line – The center line divides the two service boxes into a distinct left service box and right service box on either side of the court. Landing a serve on the line is considered good.
  • Net – The net stands 3 feet and 6 inches high where the posts lie while the middle of the net is 3 feet tall, with the posts 3 feet outside of the court on either side.  Hitting a ball into the net is considered an out while any ball that hits the net cord and falls onto the other side is considered good except for a serve, which allows for a re-do, or let.
  • Service Line – The service line separates the forecourt from the back court, and it also marks the length of the service box.
  • Singles Sideline – The singles sideline is the innermost line running lengthwise and determines the boundary of play for singles matches as well as the width of the service box.
  • Doubles Sideline – The doubles sideline is the outermost line running lengthwise and is only used in doubles matches.

Who Serves First?

A flip of the coin or spin of the racket, known as the toss, determines which player or team serves first. If called correctly, the player or team that did so chooses who serves first. The player/team who did not call it correctly decides which side of the court they want to play on first.

Rally

The rally consists of the exchange of shots after the serve is made until a player/team makes a mistake and loses the point. Any shot that is hit within bounds is considered
good and allows the rally to continue. If you want to learn how to play tennis, you will need to know how to rally consistently.

Serving and Choosing Sides

  • Foot Fault – A foot fault is when a player steps into the court or crosses the center mark before they have made contact with the ball. This results in the loss of the serve.
  • Proper Serve – A player serves on the right side of the court at the beginning of each game, with the goal of serving the ball into the diagonal service box. If the serve lands in the correct service box, play can continue. The server switches to serve on the left side for the next point, and vice versa until the game is over.
  • First Service – The server is allowed two chances to land their ball into the service box. The first attempt is known as the first service. Failing the first service leads to the second service.
  • Second Service – The second attempt is known as the second service. Failing the second service results in the loss of the point.
  • Let – A let is a re-do given to a player who serves although the ball hits the net cord before falling into the correct service box. You are allowed an infinite amount of lets, although it does not happen often.
  • Order of Service – The player/team who wins the toss serves first (team that wins chooses which player serves). If playing singles matches, players alternate between
    serving and receiving every game. If playing doubles matches, teams alternate between serving and receiving every game, with each player on a team getting the  chance to serve before the cycle repeats.
  • Switching Sides – Players/teams switch sides for every odd-numbered game (so, games 3, 5, 7 etc.)

Singles Vs. Doubles Tennis Rules

The tennis rules for singles and doubles matches are a little different, although mainly regarding serving order and court size. Doubles tennis rules are just slightly adapted to make room for an extra player on either side of the court, but for the most part, doubles tennis rules are very much the same as singles matches. So, here’s how to play tennis for singles and doubles matches.

Singles Tennis Rules

Court Size

A singles court uses the innermost sideline and measures a total of 27 feet wide by 78 feet long.

Serving Order

The player who wins the toss chooses who serves first. Whomever is serving first serves for the entire duration of the first game. After the game, the next server will be the player who received last, serving for the duration of the second game. For every odd-numbered game, players switch sides of the court.

Tie-Break Serving Order

If a score of 6-6 is reached and tie-break rules are used, a tie-break game is played in order to determine which player wins the set. For a tie-break game, the goal is to reach 7 points first with a lead of at least 2, and doing so results in the win of the set. The player who serves first is the player who would normally serve after 6-6, or 12 games.

The serving order for a tie-break is as follows:

  • Point 1: Player A
  • Point 2: Player B
  • Point 3: Player B
  • Point 4: Player A
  • Point 5: Player A
  • Point 6: Player B
  • Point 7: Player B
  • Point 8: Player A
  • Point 9: Player A

Match Format

A singles match is often played to the best of 3 sets, although some mens singles tournaments play to the best of 5. It really all depends on the preferences of
the players on the rules of the tournament.

Doubles Tennis Rules

Court Size

A doubles court uses the outermost sideline and measures a total of 36 feet wide by 78 feet long.

Serving Order

The team who wins the toss chooses which team serves first, and that team will choose which of them will serve first. Whoever is serving first serves for the entire duration of the first game. After the game, the next server will be chosen by that team and will serve for the duration of the second game. For every odd-numbered game, teams switch sides of the court, and the player who hasn’t served yet from the first game must now serve, and the player who hasn’t served yet from the second team serves afterward, and so on.

Tie-Break Serving Order

The serving order for a tie-break is as follows:

  • Point 1: Player A
  • Point 2: Player X
  • Point 3: Player X
  • Point 4: Player B
  • Point 2: Player X
  • Point 6: Player A
  • Point 7: Player Y
  • Point 8: Player A
  • Point 9: Player A

Match Format

A doubles match is often played to the best of 5 sets.